Resisting Arrest Should Not Be a Death Sentence

mike-roweI don’t know who Mike Rowe is, other than he is the host of a show on CNN called Somebody’s Gotta Do It. Somehow he seems to think he has the knowledge and understanding to weigh in on the controversy surrounding Ferguson, Eric Garner and police protests. He fails miserably.

He relates a heated conversation between liberals and conservatives.

Within moments, everyone was talking about Garner and Brown, and the conversation got very political very quickly. A liberal guest said, ‘Look, I wasn’t there, but it seems pretty clear that both men would still be alive had they been white.’ A conservative guest replied, ‘I wasn’t there either, but it seems pretty clear that both men would still be alive if they hadn’t resisted arrest.’

This annoyed the liberal, who asked the conservative why Republicans wanted a ‘police state.’ This annoyed the conservative, who asked the liberal why Democrats wanted ‘total anarchy.’ Things continued to escalate, and within moments, fingers were pointing, veins were bulging, and logical fallacies were filling the air. Ho! ho! ho!

Then, he goes on to say that all agree that both sides wanted “law and order” – but broke down over what that looked like.

Next, he relates a conversation with a black friend from Baltimore who lamented the whole issue and was “tired of being represented by two petty criminals who died resisting arrest.”

After rallying around the police and as he admits

I’m trying to get my head around the fact that two cops are dead in Brooklyn, assassinated by a lunatic in ‘retaliation’ for Ferguson and Staten Island.

The shaming of the protesters begins

A few days ago, people were marching in the streets, literally calling for the execution of police. (‘What do we want? Dead Cops!’) Others are standing by today, waiting to lionize the assassins who answer the call. These are not the champions of justice; these are the enemies of civilization, and it’s up to sensible people on both sides of the aisle to close ranks and shout them down.

Every group that is leading the protests of police brutality of people of color has publicly and forcefully denounced the killings of the NYPD officers and called for peaceful protests. But I guess Mike didn’t read those statements or read that the chants to kill cops was fake.

Here’s his final analysis

I support peaceful protests, and I’m all for rooting out bad cops. But let’s not stop there. If we’re serious about saving lives, and eliminating the confrontations that lead to the demise of Garner and Brown, let’s also condemn the stupidity that leads so many Americans to resist arrest.

I don’t care if you’re white, black, red, periwinkle, burnt umber, or chartreuse — resisting arrest is not a right, it’s a crime. And it’s never a good idea.

How tidy.

First, since when has resisting arrest been a death sentence? How many whites have been killed resisting arrest for walking in the middle of the street or selling cigarettes on the corner?

Second, let’s just forget the hundreds, if not thousands, of people of color who have been killed by police or security personnel for doing nothing but being in the wrong place and the wrong time. Maybe they were holding a toy gun, but more often, they were just minding their own business. Either way they weren’t resisting arrest.

Mike wants to have it both ways – recognize the plight of people of color in this country, but raise the law and order flag to not offend or appear to sympathize with the protests.

All sanitized, neat and smug.

Now I know why I don’t watch CNN and I get my news from Democracy Now!

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One thought on “Resisting Arrest Should Not Be a Death Sentence

  1. There is a lot of complex, coded language that goes on in these kinds of responses. The idea that black men are automatically criminals, that criminals and people of color do not have Constitutional rights or the same rights as white people, the idea that white people can speak for, instead of speak to or cite the words of actual people of color.

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